Monday, December 9, 2013

Wrapping things up...

The end of the semester is here. It's the final week! I've had limited access to internet, at home, where I've been doing most of my work the past couple of weeks. I haven't been able to post as frequently as I'd hoped. So, this post is a bit of a catch-up.

Over Thanksgiving Break I completed the drawings for Simon's Story. I broke a personal best record, completing the sixty-four drawings in roughly fourteen days. If all goes according to plan, the work will be displayed on the wall for easy viewing, but also as a book dummy.

I am happy with how the drawings turned out, despite my earlier reservations. At the start of the semester I had hoped that whatever images resulted from the project would be of a certain quality, polished and finished in Adobe Illustrator, as is my familiar modus operandi. It took me far from my comfort zone to retool my thinking toward taking the images to the level of finish seen below. But, like I said, I'm happy with the results.

It took me another few days to lay in the textual elements. After realizing that my original idea, to hand draw all of the type, wasn't in the cards, for various reasons, it took some digging through the internet to find an appropriate type-face. I landed on what you see below. I felt it matched, nicely, the rough and gritty personality of the drawings.

As I look back over the work, I'm excited about what I've learned. I started the semester with a goal of telling a story and I did that. It wasn't easy, but I did it. Along the way I learned about planning and development and especially about loosening up.

Additionally, this past weekend, I completed the final paper for the Theory & Crit class. Fifteen pages, three lenses, examining my own work. A little less pleasant than I had expected, but I learned a lot from the experience. And, I completed the final project for Digital Culture - a pile of laser-cut pieces in the shape of Jeb, the dog with hands from Simon's Story. I'll have these as give-aways at the critique and opening reception.

Without further ado, here are the sixty-four pages of Simon's Story.

































































10 comments:

bellandpixel said...

Congratulations and it's been an honor to work with you!

Brokebot said...

Congrats! I'm sure you will have a good accomplishment buzz when the semester is finally over! Very nice work!

Matthew Mohr said...

Well timed, mysterious and engaging. Nice! Lemmie know when I can buy a copy! -M.

Brokebot said...

The script format for the text is off putting. Is this the finished product?

Thom Glick said...

Charlotte - Thanks! It has likewise been an honor to work with you. I learned so much.
*I think I could have dropped a few more of those horizon lines.

Matt - Thanks for the kind words. I'll keep you posted.

Brokebot - Off putting? Do explain.

KMcGstudio said...

Fantastic work as always! Glad to see the story and hard work come to fruition.

Thom Glick said...

Kevin - Thanks for the kind words. I appreciate it.

Brokebot said...

Well since this is a comic format its common to associate the words with the image but having the name of the character saying it beside the words every time is odd and a lot of times unnecessary especially when its back and forth. reading a conversation but between every line is, Simon, Jeb, Simon, Jeb. It messes with the flow. If you even just staggered the text boxes it would be self explanatory most of the time. Or you could use a slightly different font for each character or something. The character name starts to seem almost patronizing like i'm too dumb to know that the next person talking is the other person in the conversation. Plus its obviously a script format so why is it still in this format when there are visual clues that allow the names to be eliminated?
It looks right because of the fact that you used a typewriter font because old scripts used to be type written but it is distracting to the imagery I think. Just my opinion I'm sure you know.

Brokebot said...

I really like the frame with the horses ankles where you are still hearing the conversation and the one where he reaches his destination and is sitting on the bed contemplating or something and the coffee cups scene.

My only issue with the narrative was why was there no conversation about the shooting of the elemental? I would have wondered what happened or why he shot the thing or what the fuck is that thing etc but nothing, just, time to get back on the road.

Brokebot said...

It makes me laugh that the blog keeps insisting that I, "Please prove you're not a robot."